geekographer
geekographer:

Let’s Get Nerding!
We all miss the hell out of the IT Crowd. For some, the finale was just enough, just right…a perfect ending to a perfect show. I take a different position. That position finds me on the floor, pleading — to no one in particular — to please continue producing episodes.
Alas, I will forever suffer the torments of ‘could-have-been’ and ‘what if’, etc. I guess I will soldier on, always looking out for my next geek-out staple.
I thought the best thing to do would be to come up with more graphic print designs based on quotes from the show. 
The finale was chock full of nonsense, critiques on the plagues of common men, and effing hilarious one-liners. Needless to say, I have much ground to mine for inspiration.

geekographer:

Let’s Get Nerding!

We all miss the hell out of the IT Crowd. For some, the finale was just enough, just right…a perfect ending to a perfect show. I take a different position. That position finds me on the floor, pleading — to no one in particular — to please continue producing episodes.

Alas, I will forever suffer the torments of ‘could-have-been’ and ‘what if’, etc. I guess I will soldier on, always looking out for my next geek-out staple.

I thought the best thing to do would be to come up with more graphic print designs based on quotes from the show. 

The finale was chock full of nonsense, critiques on the plagues of common men, and effing hilarious one-liners. Needless to say, I have much ground to mine for inspiration.

art-conservation

insidepafa:

PAFA Conservation Intern, Daisy DeMarsh, has just completed the gargantuan task of retouching hundreds of losses to Portrait of an Unidentified Man, by Thomas Anshutz, who was a PAFA instructor and contemporary of Thomas Eakins.

The white spots in the “before inpainting” photo (above left) represent flake losses of paint, probably due to water damage. To restore the areas of loss, Daisy used the same pigments Anshutz would have used, but they were suspended in a reversible synthetic resin instead of the oil paint that was originally used by the artist. A synthetic resin is used so that—if anyone needs to remove Daisy’s work in the future—they can do so easily with mild solvents that will not damage the original paint.